Books Recommended by Mark Cuban – [with Short Summaries]

In recent years, self-made billionaire Mark Cuban has become something of an icon in the business world. He’s known for his brash, no-nonsense style and for his willingness to take risks.

He’s also known for his love of reading. In fact, Cuban is such an avid reader that he even recommends books to budding entrepreneurs. Here are some of the books that Cuban has recommended in recent years.

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand is a novel about Objectivism, which is the philosophy that holds that reason is the only means of acquiring knowledge and that human beings are rational beings who should act in accordance with reason.

The novel’s protagonist, Dagny Taggart, is a self-made woman who is trying to keep her family’s railroad business afloat in the midst of an increasingly collectivist society. The novel presents a future in America in which the government has nationalized industries and controls the economy.

Call Me Ted by Ted Turner

Call Me Ted by Ted Turner

In his new book, Call Me Ted, Ted Turner opens up about his life and career in a way that he never has before. Turner is one of the most successful media moguls in history, and in this book, he gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at how he built his empire.

Turner was born in 1938 into a wealthy family in Atlanta, Georgia. His father owned a successful advertising agency, which gave Turner a privileged upbringing. He was sent to private schools and had every opportunity to succeed in life.

Cashing in on the American Dream by Paul Terhorst

Cashing in on the American Dream by Paul Terhorst

When it comes to retirement, most people have one goal: to live the American Dream. And Paul Terhorst’s book, Cashing in on the American Dream, shows readers how to do just that.

The book starts with a simple premise: that retirement doesn’t have to mean living on a fixed income. Instead, Terhorst argues, retirees can and should continue to invest in their future. He then goes on to show how this can be done by outlining a number of strategies that retirees can use to make the most of their money.

Cold Calling Techniques by Stephan Schiffman

Cold Calling Techniques by Stephan Schiffman

In his book, Cold Calling Techniques, Stephan Schiffman provides readers with a step-by-step guide on how to make successful cold calls.

He begins by explaining the importance of preparation and goal setting and then provides specific techniques for making effective cold calls, such as building rapport and handling objections. With Schiffman’s help, readers will be able to confidently make cold calls that result in new business opportunities.

Competing in the Age of AI by Marco Iansiti

Competing in the Age of AI by Marco Iansiti

In his new book, Competing in the Age of AI, Marco Iansiti argues that the key to success in the era of artificial intelligence is not to be the biggest or the strongest company, but to be the fastest.

He draws on examples from history and from today’s business world to show how companies that are able to move quickly and adapt to change are the ones that thrive.

Healthy Buildings by Joseph Allen

Healthy Buildings by Joseph Allen

In his book Healthy Buildings, Joseph Allen makes the case that indoor spaces have a profound impact on our health and productivity.

He argues that the quality of the air we breathe, the temperature and humidity of our surroundings, and even the amount of natural light we’re exposed to can all affect our physical and mental well-being.

Allen draws on years of research to show how small changes to our indoor environments can make a big difference in our health and productivity.

He offers practical tips for designing healthier buildings, from incorporating more natural light and ventilation to using materials that improve air quality.

Hopping Over The Rabbit Hole by Anthony Scaramucci

Hopping Over The Rabbit Hole by Anthony Scaramucci

In his new book, Hopping Over The Rabbit Hole, Anthony Scaramucci takes readers on a wild ride through the looking glass into the world of finance and politics.

A former hedge fund manager and Trump administration official, Scaramucci pulls no punches in this tell-all account of his time in the trenches of Wall Street and Washington.

Scaramucci doesn’t hold back when it comes to dishing the dirt on the Trump administration, which he served for just ten days as White House Communications Director. In one particularly scathing passage, he describes Trump as “a living breathing smorgasbord of every bad habit known to man.” Ouch.

How To Win at the Sport of Business by Mark Cuban

How To Win at the Sport of Business by Mark Cuban

In business, as in sports, there are certain tried and true principles that lead to success.

In “How To Win at the Sport of Business”, Mark Cuban lays out some of the key strategies that have helped him become one of the most successful entrepreneurs in the world. By following Cuban’s advice, you too can find success in business.

It’s About Damn Time by Arlan Hamilton

It's About Damn Time by Arlan Hamilton

In her new book, It’s About Damn Time, Arlan Hamilton tells her story of how she went from being homeless to becoming one of the most successful venture capitalists in the country.

Linchpin by Seth Godin

Linchpin by Seth Godin

In his book, Linchpin, Seth Godin argues that the key to success in the modern economy is to become a linchpin: an individual who brings unique insight and value to their work.

Godin argues that the traditional model of success – get a good education, get a good job, and work hard – is no longer effective in today’s world. Instead, he urges readers to find their own unique talents and use them to create value for others.

Machine Learning for Dummies by John Paul Mueller

Machine Learning for Dummies by John Paul Mueller

Machine learning is a branch of artificial intelligence that deals with the creation of computer programs that can learn from data and improve their performance over time. It has been used in a variety of fields, including finance, healthcare, and manufacturing.

In recent years, machine learning has become increasingly popular due to the availability of large datasets and the development of powerful computing resources. A number of companies have invested heavily in machine learning, and it is now used in a wide range of applications.

Mr. Putin by Fiona Hill

Mr. Putin by Fiona Hill

In her book, Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin, Fiona Hill provides readers with an intimate look at the Russian president, Vladimir Putin.

Drawing on her years of experience as a Russia expert, Hill gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at how Putin operates and why he is so successful.

Putin came to power in 1999, after years of working his way up through the ranks of the Soviet intelligence service. He quickly consolidated power and has since been able to keep a firm grip on Russia, despite challenges from within and without.

Our Mathematical Universe by Max Tegmark

Our Mathematical Universe by Max Tegmark

In our mathematical universe, Max Tegmark argues, everything is made of mathematics.

At its simplest, this means that the physical world is nothing but a giant mathematical structure. But it also has far-reaching and profound implications for how we think about the universe and our place within it.

Political Tribes by Amy Chua

Political Tribes by Amy Chua

In her book Political Tribes, Yale professor Amy Chua argues that Americans are increasingly divided into two camps: cosmopolitan and parochial.

On the one hand, there are the cosmopolitans, who view America as a force for good in the world and believe that its international engagement is essential. They tend to be highly educated and work in finance, technology, or media.

Principles by Ray Dalio

Principles by Ray Dalio

Ray Dalio is the Founder and Co-Chief Investment Officer of Bridgewater Associates, one of the world’s largest and most successful hedge funds.

In his book, Principles, Dalio shares his unique approach to life and work, which he has used to create an extraordinarily successful career and company.

Dalio’s principles are based on his own experience and observations of what works well and what doesn’t. They are designed to be flexible and adaptable to any situation, because as Dalio says, “the only thing that is constant is change.”

Principles for Dealing With The Changing World Order by Ray Dalio

Principles for Dealing With The Changing World Order by Ray Dalio

In a rapidly changing world, it is more important than ever to have a clear set of principles to guide your actions.

In his new book, Principles for Dealing with the Changing World Order, billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio lays out a practical framework for understanding and navigating the major shifts taking place in the global economy.

Dalio begins by identifying four major trends that are upending the existing world order: the rise of China, the declining power of the US, the increasing importance of technology, and rising income inequality. He then goes on to offer a set of principles for dealing with each of these trends.

Rebooting AI by Gary Marcus

Rebooting AI by Gary Marcus

We are in the midst of an AI winter. The public is losing faith in the ability of AI to deliver on its promises, and progress has stalled. But there is hope.

In his book, Rebooting AI, Gary Marcus sets out a plan for how we can get back on track and build artificial intelligence we can trust.

Rework by Jason Fried

Rework by Jason Fried

Rework is a book about business and work written by Jason Fried. In it, Fried argues that the conventional wisdom about work is often wrong.

He provides evidence and practical advice for how to be more productive, happier, and successful in work and in life.

Self-Made Success by Shaan Patel

Self-Made Success by Shaan Patel

Self-made success is an essential American ideal. It’s the belief that anyone, no matter where they come from, can pull themselves up by their bootstraps and achieve anything they set their mind to. And it’s a story that Shaan Patel knows well.

That’s What She Said by Joanne Lipman

That's What She Said by Joanne Lipman

In her new book, That’s What She Said, Joanne Lipman sets out to explore the origins of the phrase and its implications for office culture today.

The book starts with a brief history of the phrase, tracing its roots back to the Shakespearean theater.

In Shakespeare’s day, women were not allowed to perform on stage, so male actors would play both female and male roles. To indicate that a line was meant to be spoken by a female character, the actor would say “that’s what she said.”

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

The story of architect Howard Roark and his battle against conformity has resonated with readers for generations.

Some see Rand’s philosophy of Objectivism as a call to selfishness and egotism, while others find it empowering and inspiring. Love it or hate it, there’s no denying that The Fountainhead is a thought-provoking work of fiction.

The Gospel of Wealth by Andrew Carnegie

The Gospel of Wealth by Andrew Carnegie

In his essay “The Gospel of Wealth,” published in 1901, Andrew Carnegie argues that the rich have a duty to use their wealth for the good of society.

He believes that the wealthy should use their money to create opportunities for others, rather than simply accumulating more and more wealth.

Carnegie’s views on the role of the wealthy in society were controversial at the time, but he believed strongly in the power of philanthropy to improve the world.

The Great Revolt by Salena Zito

The Great Revolt by Salena Zito

In 2016, then-candidate Donald Trump promised to revive the American economy and put American workers first.

In the two years since he was elected, he has made good on that promise with tax reform, deregulation, and an “America First” trade policy.

These policies have caused a great revolt among the American people, who are now seeing more jobs and better wages. The Great Revolt is a movement that is sweeping the nation, and it is one that is being led by President Trump.

The Innovators Dilemma by Clayton Christensen

The Innovators Dilemma by Clayton Christensen

The Innovators Dilemma, by Clayton Christensen, is a book about how companies can fail by not innovating. Christensen argues that companies tend to stick to what has worked in the past, and when new technologies come along, they are slow to embrace them.

This can lead to the company being disrupted by new entrants who are able to take advantage of the new technology. The book provides examples of how this has happened in various industries and provides advice on how companies can avoid being caught in this trap.

The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

The Lean Startup book by Eric Reis is about how startups can achieve success by using a lean, customer-focused approach.

The book provides readers with practical tools and advice for how to create and sustain a successful startup. It also offers insights into how to avoid common mistakes that can lead to failure.

The Lean Startup is essential reading for anyone interested in starting or growing a business.

The Master Algorithm by Pedro Domingos

The Master Algorithm by Pedro Domingos

In “The Master Algorithm”, Pedro Domingos argues that a single algorithm could be used to learn anything that can be learned by computers.

This so-called “master algorithm” would give computers the ability to learn any task that humans can perform, from playing chess to understanding natural language. While this may sound like a far-fetched idea, Domingos makes a compelling case for its plausibility.

In doing so, he offers readers a crash course in machine learning, one of the hottest fields in computer science.

The Only Game In Town by Mohamed El-Erian

The Only Game In Town by Mohamed El-Erian

Mohamed El-Erian’s book, The Only Game In Town, is a timely and important read. In it, El-Erian argues that the global economy is in a period of transition and that central banks are the only game in town when it comes to ensuring stability.

The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need by Andrew Tobias

The Only Investment Guide You'll Ever Need by Andrew Tobias

If you’re looking for a comprehensive guide to investing, look no further than Andrew Tobias’s The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need.

Tobias covers everything from the basics of saving and investing to more complex topics like estate planning and portfolio management. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned investor, this book has something for everyone.

The Politics Industry by Katherine Gehl

The Politics Industry by Katherine Gehl

Katherine Gehl is the president and CEO of The Gehl Group, a strategic advisory firm. She has also served as a senior executive in both the public and private sectors, including as the chief operating officer of the Wisconsin Department of Commerce.

In her new book, The Politics Industry: How Political Innovation Can Break the Partisan Deadlock, Gehl argues that our current political system is failing us.

She contends that the two-party system is no longer capable of solving our country’s most pressing problems and that it’s time for a new political paradigm.

The Power of Broke by Daymond John

The Power of Broke by Daymond John

In The Power of Broke, Daymond John argues that being broke can be one of the biggest advantages an entrepreneur has. Being broke forces you to be resourceful and creative, and it gives you a sense of urgency that can lead to breakthroughs.

John draws on his own experiences as a young entrepreneur to show how he used the power of broke to start his clothing line, FUBU.

He also shares stories from other successful entrepreneurs like Jay-Z and Barbara Corcoran, who have used their own experiences with poverty and adversity to create businesses worth billions of dollars.

The Sports Gene by David Epstein

The Sports Gene by David Epstein

David Epstein’s book The Sports Gene takes a comprehensive look at the science of athleticism. He examines the role of genes, environment, and training in athletic success.

Epstein draws on cutting-edge research to explore the many factors that contribute to athletic ability. He debunks common myths about sports and performance and offers insights into the complex interplay of nature and nurture in athletes.

The Sports Gene is a must-read for anyone interested in the science of sports and human performance. It provides valuable insights into what it takes to be a great athlete, and how we can all optimize our own physical potential.

The True Believer by Eric Hoffer

The True Believer by Eric Hoffer

The True Believer, by Eric Hoffer, is a 1951 book about the psychology of mass movements. It explores why people join movements and become true believers. Hoffer argues that people join movements to find meaning in their lives.

They are looking for something to believe in and something to commit to. This need for meaning can be caused by a feeling of emptiness or loneliness.

Sometimes people join movements because they are angry or frustrated with their own lives. They may also feel like they belong to a group or have a sense of purpose.

The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis

The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis

In his new book, The Undoing Project, Michael Lewis tells the story of how two Israeli psychologists helped to change the way we think about human behavior.

Lewis chronicles the work of Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman, who developed a new field of study known as behavioral economics. Their work showed that people often make decisions based on irrational factors, such as emotions and biases.

Tversky and Kahneman’s work has had a profound impact on everything from economic policy to marketing to sports. As Lewis shows, their ideas are still being used today to help us better understand human behavior.

White Working Class by Joan Williams

White Working Class by Joan Williams

Joan Williams’ book, White Working Class, is a groundbreaking look at the working class in America.

In it, she argues that the white working class has been left behind by both political parties and that their economic anxieties have been exploited for political gain.

Why Men Rebel by Ted Robert Gurr

Why Men Rebel by Ted Robert Gurr

In Why Men Rebel, Ted Robert Gurr seeks to explain the motivations behind why men rebel.

He looks at a variety of factors, including material deprivation, relative deprivation, and group position. He argues that when any of these are present, it increases the likelihood of rebellion.

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