Books Recommended by Douglas Murray (Complete List)

Douglas Murray (born 16 July 1979) is a British intellectual, author, journalist, and political commentator.

He founded the Centre for Social Cohesion in 2007, which became part of the Henry Jackson Society, where he was associate director from 2011 to 2018.

He is also an associate editor of the conservative-leaning British political and cultural magazine The Spectator.

Here are some books that he recommends.

Living with the Gods by Neil MacGregor

Living with the Gods by Neil MacGregor

In his book, Living with the Gods, Neil MacGregor offers a captivating exploration of religious belief and practice around the world. Drawing on art, literature, and personal accounts, MacGregor reveals the ways in which different cultures have attempted to make sense of the divine.

Whether considering the role of animals in religious rituals or the use of human sacrifice to appease angry gods, MacGregor shows that religion is not simply about belief, but about how we live our lives.

In a world increasingly defined by religious conflict, Living with the Gods is an essential read for anyone seeking to understand the profound impact that religion has on our world.

Power and the Idealists by Paul Berman

Power and the Idealists by Paul Berman

In his book Power and the Idealists, Paul Berman argues that the Bush administration’s foreign policy is motivated by a desire to spread democracy around the world.

He contends that this view is na├»ve and idealistic and that it ignores the realities of power politics. Berman believes that the Bush administration’s policies are doomed to fail because they are based on a false understanding of human nature.

The Beekeeper of Sinjar by Dunya Mikhail

The Beekeeper of Sinjar by Dunya Mikhail

Dunya Mikhail’s The Beekeeper of Sinjar is a heart-wrenching and beautifully written account of the Yazidi community in Northern Iraq and their fight for survival.

Mikhail chronicles the atrocities faced by the Yazidis at the hands of ISIS, as well as their incredible resilience in the face of such violence. The book is a powerful testament to the strength of the human spirit and will leave readers both moved and inspired.

Whiteshift by Eric Kauffman

Whiteshift by Eric Kauffman

In his book, Whiteshift, Eric Kauffman argues that white identity politics is the wave of the future. As Western societies become more ethnically diverse, whites are increasingly adopting a racial identity and seeing themselves as a beleaguered minority. This “whiteshift” has profound implications for our politics and our social cohesion.

Kauffman makes a compelling case that we need to take seriously the rise of white identity politics. He shows how this phenomenon is already reshaping our politics in Europe and the United States, and he warns that it could lead to further polarization and even violence if we don’t find ways to address it.

This is an important book that should be required reading for anyone who wants to understand the dynamics of race and ethnicity in the 21st century.

With Ash on Their Faces by Cathy Otten

With Ash on Their Faces by Cathy Otten

Cathy Otten’s book, “With Ash on Their Faces” is a collection of stories about her experience as a Red Cross worker during the September 11th terrorist attacks.

Otten was one of the first responders to the attacks, and her book provides a firsthand account of the tragedy.

The book is a moving tribute to the victims of 9/11 and provides an intimate look at the aftermath of the attacks through Otten’s eyes.

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